Post Popular. 3.7.19. Alphabetti

Where to start with this one… how’s about we keep it simple and start by calling this the bravest performance I’ve ever seen and work back from there because, really, that’s all you need to know.  And that’s all you should need to know before you see this show; because Post Popular pushes the type of buttons other comedy shows go nowhere near.  Billed as Red Dwarf meets Monty Python, singer, dancer, comedian, performance artist and exhibitionist Lucy McCormick (plus two important supports) brings neither spaceships nor parrots to a performance which uses both shock and cringe as it’s main vehicles for laughs.  Loosely using historical characters (the Red Dwarf part presumably) to make interesting points about culture, Popular’s use of abstract comedy (the Monty Python part) uses varying degrees of nudity, careful choreography, and clever delivery, to forge a collection of short moments which fit under one hugely powerful, hugely impactful, tour-de-force.  Part Lena Dunham in it’s clinging to ‘I can’t watch’ moments and part Rent a Ghost outlandishness, Post is, without giving away any secrets, a full on variety of characters, mediums and moments which ram McCormick’s point so far into your subconsciousness that the main joke becomes obvious.  Well delivered interconnected shorts cleverly linked together in the creation of an overarching arc, Post at its heart is led by brave choices, strong acting and well executed routines. Wow. 

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How’s about we keep this one simple and start by calling this the bravest performance I’ve ever seen and work back from there; because, really, that’s all you need to know.  Aside, perhaps, from the fact that Post Popular pushes buttons that other comedy shows go nowhere near.  Billed as Red Dwarf meets Monty Python, singer, dancer, comedian, performance artist and exhibitionist Lucy McCormick (plus two important supports) brings neither spaceships nor parrots to a performance which loosely uses historical characters (the Red Dwarf part presumably) to make interesting points about female cultural icons and their impact on society.  Strong use of abstract comedy (the Monty Python part) mixed with varying degrees of nudity, careful choreography, and wit, forge an inter-connected collection of short moments cleverly linked in an overarching story arc examining gender equality and gender politics.  Part Lena Dunham in its ‘I can’t watch’ moments and part Rent a Ghost slapstick, Post is, without giving away any secrets, a variety of characters, mediums and moments which ram McCormick’s point so far into your subconsciousness that the serious points become obvious.  Led by brave choices, strong acting and well executed routines, Post leaves you both aghast and slapped in the face with both its delivery but also its message.

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